The Best Fat Burners Without Stimulants

Having a great body image is attractive and boosts your self-esteem as long as it does not hamper your health. Feeling confident about your body is just as important as taking care of it, but these two are tightly correlated. Many experts agree that healthy and clean eating coupled with regular exercise will do the trick. However, sometimes, we just need a little help to understand basic physiology and the overall body dynamics.

First Things First: COMT Genetics

Although your body is highly dependent on how you treat it, there are still important factors to consider – such as your genes. This is vital in choosing the specific diet and exercise regimen that will yield optimum results.

Each individual is unique and everybody can have different reactions to similar stimuli. In the case of non-stimulant fat burners, a factor that determines this is COMT genetics.

The important things to remember here are the CYP19 and COMT. These are the genes related to obesity. According to studies, having a specific COMT genotype coupled with at least a copy of the gene CYP19 has been related with a considerably higher decrease in a person’s BMI, total fat and body fat percentage.

It is likewise important to note that there are people who do not fare well when it comes to stimulants because of their COMT genetics. For instance, one may have sensitivity to caffeine due to a mutation in the COMT. Given this, a safer and wiser option would be to consume fat burners that do not have stimulants.

Fat Burners Without Stimulants

Though genes are a crucial factor, they are not the end-all, be-all of your body. There is a way to go about them and make your personal circumstances work for your benefit.

Diet is 70% nutrition, 30% exercise. Therefore, it is fundamental to pay attention to what you eat, when you eat, and how much you eat. Load up on healthy food and supplements to achieve your physique goals. You are what you eat.

Here are some fat burners without stimulants you should start considering:

Carnitine

Carnitine or L-Carnitine[i] is already heavily marketed as a weight loss[ii] product. While some experts say that there is a need for further research to understand carnitine better, there are already well-known and widely-accepted facts about it.

One, it is an antioxidant that is already produced in large quantities by our body. It is an amino acid produced in the liver and kidneys from lysine and methionine. The main function of Carnitine is fatty acid oxidation or simply turning fat that you consume into energy that you can use. It is also involved in glucose metabolism.

There are researchers who believe that consuming additional amounts of dietary carnitine is important for those who want to lose weight. According to them, there is evidence that suggests this may induce weight loss through raising the calorie expenditure of the body.

Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA)

Conjugated Linoleic Acid or CLA is among the popular weight loss miracle solutions today. However, it is actually a fatty acid and you can find it in meat as well as dairy products. It is dubbed as the “good trans fat”.

Unlike some fat burners, CLA is not produced by the body. Therefore, you need to find food sources that contain CLA. According to research, the best sources are products such as grass-fed beef, eggs, and safflower oil.

As a dietary supplement, it is sold usually as a pill or syrup. There are studies that prove that it can indeed help people lose body fat[iii]. It can also help you maintain weight and muscle mass.

Because it can help promote weight loss, it can also help you manage conditions related to being overweight, such as type 2 diabetes. Our favorite way of getting extra CLA into your diet is by adding butter as a creamer to your coffee or by using low carb high fat creamers.

Sesamin

Sesamin is another naturally occurring fat burner without stimulants. It is a fibrous matter that is known as lignan. The latter is a chemical compound that can be found in plants. In fact, sesamin is the most famous lignan compound that you can find in sesame seeds. Some other sources of lignans are flaxseed, wheat bran, whole grains, and vegetables.

Sesamin has also been consumed throughout history as a nutritional supplement in order to aid weight loss. According to a Japanese study, this chemical compound causes an increase in the activity of a number of liver enzymes which are responsible for breaking down fatty acids. It then optimizes the fat burning capacity of the liver. Given that, sesamin can help in aiding fat loss as well as decreasing the fat storage capacity of the body. In the same manner, it is also believed to facilitate the preservation of lean muscle mass. The latter is very important for those on a diet.

Seaweed

Seaweed is consumed by people from all around the world. It is, in fact, a common part of the diet in some areas in North America, Europe, and, of course, Asia. Now, according to scientists, it has been found in studies[iv] that a compound found in common seaweed is actually able to stop the body absorption of fat.

According to their tests, alginate that is found in sea kelp has the ability to stop the digestion of fat in your intestines. In fact, the findings showed that there was a 75% boost in anti-food absorption when a certain type of alginate was increased by four-folds.

At the same time, tests showed that the alginate that was extracted from the seaweed has the ability to lower the amount of fat that your body absorbs.

Exogenous ketones

Ketones are naturally produced by the body in the liver; but they can also be consumed as nutritional supplements. The latter is what is known as exogenous ketones.

Exogenous ketones were introduced as a nutritional supplement in 2014. Since then, they have become a huge hit worldwide, giving birth to numerous avid fans of this diet.

Ketones are used by the body to generate energy and are an alternative source of fuel. They are pretty simple organic compounds. The exogenous ketones are supplements that give the body an instant supply of ketones even when you are not in the state of ketosis, for instance, when you are on a low carb diet.

There are different benefits that can be derived from the use of exogenous ketones, one of which is a more efficient weight loss. This is achieved through appetite suppression. According to trials, the consumption of exogenous ketones resulted in a reduction of food intake, which then let to reduced weight gain .

Other benefits of this compound include enhancement of athletic performance[v], prevention of cancer[vi], improvement of cognitive functions[vii], and anti-inflammatory[viii] uses.

Fun and fitness

Losing weight isn’t always boring. Having a healthy and lean body should be a lifestyle, and if you’re going to have such a lifestyle anyway, you might want to incorporate fun into your fitness regimen.

You can try different versions and move on to the next; plan your schedule and goals in order not to hit a plateau. There are great bodyweight exercises you can check out.

Learning from the experiences of others is also great. They can be sources of information and inspiration to give you a background or springboard for your starting point. Find out about workouts, testimonials, and blogs from various people with their real-life stories of transformation and health.

Consult the experts

As previously mentioned in this article, each body may react differently. Hence, it is always imperative to consult your doctor when changing your diet or exercise. You may also have an underlying condition that might be affected by the alterations in your consumption.

As they say, your body is a temple and it should be treated as such. You are what you eat, so be sure to eat smart. Know your body and do (or consume) what is best for you.

About the Author​

Alex Eriksson is the founder of AnabolicHealth.com, a men’s health blog dedicated to providing honest and research backed advice for optimal male hormonal health. Anabolic Health aspires to become a trusted resource where men can come and learn how to fix their hormonal problems naturally, without pharmaceuticals.



[i] Sahlin, K., 2011, Boosting fat burning with carnitine: an old friend comes out from the shadow, The Journal Of Physiology Apr 1, 1509-1510, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3099008/ (September 19, 2017).

[ii] Jain, S., and Singh, S.N., 2015, Effect of l-carnitine Supplementation on Nutritional Status and Physical Performance Under Calorie Restriction, Indian journal of clinical biochemistry, April 187-193, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4393395/ (September 19, 2017).

[iii] Blankson H, Stakkestad JA, Fagertun H, Thom E, Wadstein J, Gudmundsen O., 2000, Conjugated linoleic acid reduces body fat mass in overweight and obese humans, The Journal of Nutrition December, 2943-2948, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11110851 (September 19, 2017).

[iv] Georg Jensen M, Kristensen M, Astrup A., 2012, Effect of alginate supplementation on weight loss in obese subjects completing a 12-wk energy-restricted diet: a randomized controlled trial, July, 5-13, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22648709 (September 19, 2017).

[v] Phinney, S., 2004, Ketogenic diets and physical performance, Nutrition and Metabolism, August, 1-2, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC524027/ (September 19, 2017).

[vi] Bryan G. Allen, Sudershan K. Bhatia,1 Carryn M. Anderson, Julie M. Eichenberger-Gilmore, Zita A. Sibenaller, Kranti A. Mapuskar, Joshua D. Schoenfeld, John M. Buatti, Douglas R. Spitz, and Melissa A. Fath, 2014, Redox Biology, August, 963-970, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4215472/ (September 19, 2017).

[vii] Ota M, Matsuo J, Ishida I, Hattori K, Teraishi T, Tonouchi H, Ashida K, Takahashi T, Kunugi H., 2016, Effect of a ketogenic meal on cognitive function in elderly adults: potential for cognitive enhancement., October, 3797-3802, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27568199 (September 19, 2017).

[viii] Dupuis N, Curatolo N, Benoist JF, Auvin S., 2015, Ketogenic diet exhibits anti-inflammatory properties, Epilepsia, July 95-98, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26011473 (September 19, 2017).

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